Wills -

A document in which a person specifies the method to be applied in the management and distribution of his estate after his death.

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Probate -

A probate is the court process by which a will proved valid or invalid, and by which the property of the deceased person is divided among beneficiaries.

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Trusts -

A relationship created at the request of an individual, in which one or more persons hold the individual's property subject to certain duties to use for the benefit of others.

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Power of Attorney -

A power of attorney appoints an agent to act on behalf of someone else with legal authority over their financial affairs or medical discussions.

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Conservator -

A proctector appointed by a court to manage financial affairs due to physical or mental limitations.

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Guardianships -

A legal relationship created when a person or institution named in a will or assigned by the court to take care of minor children or incompetent adults.

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Business Entity Set-Up -

In order to carry on a trade or business, a type of business entity must be chosen.

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Estate Planning -

A well-drafted estate plan is your assurance that the taxes and costs associated with your death will be minimized.

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Establish Guardianship in Colorado Springs, CO

 

A legal relationship created when a person or institution named in a will or assigned by the court to take care of minor children or incompetent adults.

To become a guardian of a child either the party intending to be the guardian or another family member, a close friend or a local official responsible for a minor's welfare will petition the court to appoint the guardian. The guardianship of a minor remains under court supervision until the child reaches majority at 18. The judge does not have to honor the request when someone is named in a will as guardian of one's child in case of the death of the parent, it is construed as a preference, but is usually honored. The term "guardian" may also refer to someone who is appointed to care for and/or handle the affairs of a person who is incompetent or incapable of administering his/her affairs. Guardians must not benefit at the expense of those they care for (wards), and in many cases are required to make accountings to the court on a periodic basis. In some courts, a guardian may be reimbursed for attorney fees related to the guardianship. Court rules regarding accountings of expenses and requirements of guardians vary and local court rules should be consulted.

In some states, if the child is a certain age or older, the court must appoint the person nominated by the child unless the court finds the nomination contrary to the child’s best interest. The court may not appoint a person against whom the child has filed a written objection. In adult guardianships, the judge is often required to make a reasonable effort to consider the preference of the person with a disability in selecting the guardian. The judge typically does not have to follow the person's wishes, but must give due consideration to the preference of the person with a disability. Laws vary by jurisdiction, so local laws should be consulted for specific requirements in your area.

A guardianship of a child takes away the parents' right to make decisions about their child's life. However, it does not permanently terminate parental rights. This means that although the guardian now has custody and is responsible for raising the child, the parents are still the child's legal parents.

The court can order a guardian to let the parents visit or contact the child, but the court may also put limits or other conditions on the visitation, such as requiring that any visitation be supervised. The time and frequency of parental visitation is often is up to the guardian (or the court) to decide. Parents may, in some cases, regain custody of their child in the future if the court determines the guardianship is no longer in their child's best interests.

Local laws vary, but many courts require certain interested parties to be served with notice of guardianship hearings. Such notices often have to be legally served upon the person, with a sworn statement of the person making the service later returned to the court as proof of such service. In some cases, the court may waive the notice requirements. Local court rules should be consulted to determine applicability in your area.

Temporary guardianships are generally granted by the courts to achieve a specific purpose for a certain amount of time. Once the purpose is accomplished, the guardianship is terminated.

State statutes define mental and physical disability. However, generally, such disability or incapacity involves severe and long-term conditions that impose great limitations upon individuals' ability to take care of themselves, express themselves verbally, earn a living, and live independently of the care of others. Such a disability also reflects the necessity for a combination of treatments and services.

Guardianships for incapacitated persons, physically or mentally disabled, in recent decades, been understood to facilitate the independence and self-reliance of the ward. The Constitution's guarantee of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness certainly applies to everyone ehether they are incapacitated or not. Guardianships are limited as much as is reasonable in order to allow wards to exercise as much control over their lives as possible while maintaining as much dignity and self-reliance as possible. The desires of the wards are given primary consideration. Also, wards are allowed to do as much of their own care giving as is physically and mentally possible.

The court will require updates describing the ward's living situation, status of mental and physical health based upon medical examinations and official records, provide a list of services being received by the ward, describe services rendered by the guardian, account for the ward's monetary assets, and any other information necessary to submit to the court in order for it to assess the status of the ward and the guardian's duties.