Wills -

A document in which a person specifies the method to be applied in the management and distribution of his estate after his death.

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Probate -

A probate is the court process by which a will proved valid or invalid, and by which the property of the deceased person is divided among beneficiaries.

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Trusts -

A relationship created at the request of an individual, in which one or more persons hold the individual's property subject to certain duties to use for the benefit of others.

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Power of Attorney -

A power of attorney appoints an agent to act on behalf of someone else with legal authority over their financial affairs or medical discussions.

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Conservator -

A proctector appointed by a court to manage financial affairs due to physical or mental limitations.

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Guardianships -

A legal relationship created when a person or institution named in a will or assigned by the court to take care of minor children or incompetent adults.

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Business Entity Set-Up -

In order to carry on a trade or business, a type of business entity must be chosen.

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Estate Planning -

A well-drafted estate plan is your assurance that the taxes and costs associated with your death will be minimized.

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Probate

A probate is the court process by which a will proved valid or invalid, and by which the property of the deceased person is divided among beneficiaries and the deceased creditors. 

The first step is to file the purported will with the clerk of the appropriate court in the county where the deceased person lived, along with a petition to have the court approve the will and appoint the executor named in the will (or if none is available, then an administrator) with declarations of a person who had signed the will as a witness. If the court determines the will is valid, the court then "admits" the will to probate. 2) n. a general term for the entire process of administration of estates of dead persons, including those without wills, with court supervision. The means of "avoiding" probate exist, including creating trusts in which all possessions are handled by a trustee, making lifetime gifts, or putting all substantial property in joint tenancy with an automatic right of survivorship in the joint owner. Even if there is a will, probate may not be necessary if the estate is small with no real estate title to be transferred, or all of the estate is either jointly owned or community property. Reasons for avoiding probate are the fees set by statute and/or the court (depending on state laws) for attorneys, executors and administrators, the need to publish notices, court hearings, paperwork, the public nature of the proceedings, and delays while waiting for creditors to file claims even when the deceased owed no one. 3) v. to prove a will in court and proceed with administration of a deceased's estate under court supervision. 4) adj. reference to the appropriate court for handling estate matters, as in "probate court." 

When a person dies, his or her estate may be subject to probate, which is a process overseen by a court. If the decedent leaves a will directing how his or her property should be distributed after death, the probate court must determine if it should be admitted to probate and given legal effect. If the decedent dies intestate—without leaving a will—the court appoints a Personal Representative to distribute the decedent's property according to the laws of Descent and Distribution and pay whatever valid claims creditors may have on the assets of the estate. These laws direct the distribution of assets based on hereditary succession.

In general, the probate process involves collecting the decedent's assets, paying creditors, paying necessary taxes, and distributing property to heirs. 

Proceedings


 

A probate proceeding may involve either formal or informal procedures. Traditionally, probate proceedings were governed by formal procedures that required the probate court to hold hearings and issue orders involving routine matters. Consequently, the legal costs of probating an estate could be substantial. States that have adopted the Uniform Probate Court (UPC) provisions on probate procedures allow informal probate proceedings that remove the probate court from most stages of the process, with the result that informal probate is cheaper and quicker than formal probate. Most small estates benefit from an informal probate proceeding.

Guardianship of Minor Children


 

Wills often contain instructions on who should be appointed legal guardian of the decedent's minor children. The probate court may investigate the qualifications of the proposed guardian before granting an order of appointment. When a will does not contain a guardianship provision, the court itself must determine, based on the best interests of the children, who should be appointed guardian.

Probate Administration

We will handle most aspects of the probate administration for you, ensuring that the probate is filed and completed in a timely fashion, allowing for prompt distribution of assets to the rightful beneficiaries.